Holidays in
Belek

Turkey’s lush coastal paradise

There aren’t too many places that successfully combine high-end luxury and unblemished wilderness. Belek is one of them. Against a postcard-pretty backdrop of shallow turquoise seas and distant, snow-capped mountains, this upscale resort is a feast for all the senses.

The area has 16 kilometres of palm-fringed, white-sand beaches, which are studded with a steadily growing number of plush, architecturally gorgeous hotels. Golfers will especially love Belek holidays – the area is home to the Turkish national course, and several others that are certified as championship standard.

Thrilling water sports such as jet-skiing and powerboating are also on offer, and the restaurant scene – based mostly in the hotels – is forward-thinking and creative. Not far away, meanwhile, the Zeytintasi cave is a monumental cathedral of stalactites, left undisturbed for millennia. Holidays to Belek will give you a taste of the good life, in surroundings of astounding natural beauty.

Your Belek questions, answered

Belek’s public beach is fabulous, but do bear in mind that loggerhead turtles lay their eggs here at certain times of year. Follow the signs to avoid disturbing precious nests.

Every Saturday, the market rolls into town, selling everything from locally grown produce to handmade crafts and jewellery – ideal for picking up a few souvenirs.

Belek enjoys 300 days of sunshine a year, so it’s a good bet year-round. From June to August, temperatures regularly top 30°C. If you like heat but not crowds, September is for you.

Best things to do in Belek

Swing by the links

Golfing really is a huge deal here, and it’s what’s behind much of Belek’s luxury growth. Don’t worry if you’re a newbie, as most clubs offer sessions for beginners.

Head to the park

Set aside a day to explore Koprulu Canyon, a ravishing national park that offers hiking trails, plunging gorges, fast-flowing rivers (popular for rafting) and countless colourful songbirds.

Go back in time

Nearby Perge is a site of great historic significance where, among other impressive ruins, archaeologists uncovered a vast Roman amphitheatre that once held 12,000 spectators.