Dalaman Holidays

A Mediterranean natural wonder

For clear, azure bathing spots and jaw-dropping scenery, Dalaman should be the first place that springs to mind. Situated on the Turkish Riviera – the ‘Turquoise Coast’ – its picturesque lagoons, indulgent mud spas and plentiful windsurfing spots offer masses of beachfront fun. A real oasis for wildlife, the region’s pine-covered hills and quiet coastline attract rare sea turtles and many bird species.

Beyond Turkey’s natural beauty, Dalaman holidays offer plenty of man-made wonders too, from the eerie ghost village of Kayakoy to the striking rock tombs precariously carved into the cliffs overlooking the Aegean Sea. Days spent sightseeing are best rounded off with a hearty Turkish meal. Step away from the main drag and you’ll encounter age-old recipes served in charming restaurants run by the same families for generations.

The great thing about holidays to Dalaman is that there is an activity to suit everyone, whatever pace you like to holiday at. Thrill-seekers searching for an adrenaline hit can paraglide off the mountain tops, partygoers can dance long into the night in Feyithe, while those after serenity can relax on a river cruise. All in all, Dalaman holidays strike the perfect balance for those searching for a relaxing retreat with scope for adventure.

Three tips for a top trip

Consider car hire

Dalaman’s attractions are dispersed around the region, so it’s a smart move to rent a car. It gives you the freedom to explore on your own schedule rather than sticking to public transport timetables.

Don’t miss the markets

From ‘kofte’ (traditional meatballs) to ‘lokmasi’ (cinnamon-covered doughnuts), Turkey’s street food is worth writing home about. The best place to try a bit of everything is one of Dalaman’s local food markets.

Take your oldest swimwear

If you’re planning a rejuvenating soak in Dalaman’s famed mud baths, wear something you don’t mind getting dirty. Save your smartest new swimwear for basking on the beach.

Best attractions to see in Dalaman

The Blue Lagoon

Set in a protected national park and surrounded by lush, hilly forest, it’s easy to see why visitors flock to the clear, calm waters of this picture-perfect lagoon.

A real-life ghost town

To soak up some history, head into the Taurus Mountains (a scenic journey in itself) and see how nature is reclaiming the abandoned village of Kayakoy.

Astonishing wildlife

Tourists aren’t the only ones attracted to Dalaman’s golden beaches. Iztuzu Beach is a nature-lover’s paradise, where rare loggerhead turtles come to breed and nest.

Your Dalaman questions, answered

Dalaman boasts a mild Mediterranean climate, with sea temperatures rarely falling below ‘warm bath’. So swimming, diving and water sports are all on the cards.
With protected status, the region is home to three species of turtle – including the endangered loggerhead – which you can spot from May to September.
Dalaman’s Mediterranean climate gives it hot summers and very mild winters. Sunseekers will find June to September the best time as this is usually the hottest and driest period. However, winter can be a nice time to travel if you want to sightsee. While Dalaman’s resort towns may shut down in the off-season, Marmaris is lively all year round. And if you want to hike through the National Park and enjoy outdoor activities, autumn and winter can be more comfortable.
For a fascinating and photogenic peek into ancient history, scope out the ruins at Kaunos or head for the hills and explore the crumbling citadel of Tlos.
Dalaman is nicknamed the Turquoise Coast and it's easy to see why. There are many beautiful beaches here that lead out to the blue Mediterranean waters. They are a mix of soft sand and pebble, so they can differ quite a bit depending on where you go. Fethiye, Sarigerme, and Marmaris all have Blue Flag beaches that are nicely maintained. And, in the resort towns, many of the luxury hotels have their own private beach areas. In the summer, there may be activities on the beach, too.
If you hold a UK passport from Britain or Northern Ireland, you don’t need to apply for a visa to visit Turkey. Without a visa, you can legally enter the country for up to 90 days at a time, within a 180-day window. You would only need to apply for a visa if you were planning to stay for longer than this.
This depends on what you’re looking for. If you want to be in the heart of all the action, Marmaris offers shopping, sunbathing, and sightseeing, with easy access to the bars and clubs at night. Dalyan, as a protected area, is quieter. Olu Deniz and Fethiye fall somewhere in the middle with more activity than in Dalyan but less than in Marmaris. These places can be good bases as they are close to some of the best attractions just outside in the Dalaman area, like the Saklikent Gorge.
If you’re visiting Marmaris and you’re happy to stay in the town itself, you won’t need to hire a car. The town is very compact and walkable. For a change of scenery, it’s even possible to walk to Icmeler in about 90 minutes. It’s a lovely walk that takes you right along the coast. But if you want to see more of Dalaman, it can really help to have a set of wheels. Dalaman is quite a large area and there are no trains in this part of Turkey, so a hire car really is the most convenient way to get about.
Dalaman is a great part of Turkey to take the kids to. The hotels here are geared up for families with children and many offer some sort of evening entertainment. There’s also plenty for families to do in the region. You can enjoy fun days out at Dalaman’s beaches, where it’s possible to swim, splash about, and build sandcastles. There are some attractions, such as water parks, near Marmaris. The local national parks and reserves are good for walking and exploring nature.