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Cala Millor Holidays

Family resort with beautiful beach

One of Majorca’s original holiday resorts, Cala Millor (meaning ‘Better Bay’) remains a quintessential spot on the island for a family-friendly beach break. Cala Millor holidays centre around the resort’s impressive Blue Flag-awarded beach, which stretches almost 2 kilometres along the east coast with swathes of white sand lapped by turquoise water.

A buzzy promenade snakes along the length of the beaches all the way up to the more sedate Cala Bona, while a long pedestrian street lined with numerous enticing bars, restaurants and shops takes you through the middle of the town. A short stroll to the south, nature lovers can ramble through a protected reserve and enjoy fabulous views along the scenic coast. Add in some laid-back nightlife and great leisure facilities, and it’s no surprise why so many families return for holidays to Cala Millor year after year.

Your Cala Millor questions, answered

Cala Millor and its surroundings can all be easily explored on foot or by bike. There’s also a tourist train that connects to the nearby resorts of Cala Bona, S’Illot and Sa Coma.
For guaranteed sunshine and calm sea, you can’t beat the months of July and August. If you want to avoid the crowds, the sun and sea are still warm in autumn.
Eastern Majorca is known for its wide stretches of soft white sand. In addition to Cala Millor and Sa Coma, some charming smaller beaches are just as attractive and with all the facilities you could need. Porto Cristo is a pretty little fishing village set around a natural harbour. It’s a popular starting point for people looking to explore the caves and underground lakes. Further south still you can go to Cala Varques, a secluded beach hidden at the end of an inlet. Perfect for safe snorkelling, this is where couples retreat or families escape the busier beaches.
Cala Millor was essentially created for the tourist industry. While other corners of Majorca are packed with history, this beautiful beach is backed by hotels and facilities that have grown and developed since the 1930s. Many of the hotels have their own on-site entertainment but, step outside, and you’ll find restaurants, bars and clubs lining the streets. You should come here if you want lively nightlife. While it isn’t as wild as some corners of Majorca, you'll still find a fun, relaxed atmosphere.
Cala Millor’s collection of bars and clubs means you can have an enjoyable evening whether you fancy karaoke, a quiet drink or dancing all night.
This is one of Majorca’s most popular resort areas for families. The beaches are patrolled by lifeguards in the busy months and the water is shallow and warm. The soft sand is perfect for games of volleyball or constructing elaborate sandcastles. And you’re never far from a cafe or restaurant, many with English standards on the menu – ideal for young children who don’t want to explore foreign food. If you want a day without sand, Marineland is only an hour’s drive. It puts on regular dolphin and sea lion shows and has a huge aquarium.
A beautiful promenade connects pretty Cala Bona with the beach at Cala Millor, and it’s just 15 minutes of flat, easy walking between the two. The promenade stretches along the Mediterranean and you'll discover cafes and restaurants the length of the short walk between the two towns. You'll have palm trees, a gentle breeze and the sparkling blue sea – a walk doesn’t get much better than that.
You can visit a small seasonal market in Cala Millor from March to October but you can find some popular local markets nearby, too. A 40-minute walk or a five-minute bus ride on a Friday morning to Son Servera is a good choice. It’s an authentic selection of locally crafted lace tablecloths and leather handbags. Buses can also take you to nearby Sineu, Inca and Arta markets on other weekdays and it’s worth visiting at least one for a glimpse of traditional Majorcan life.
The Punta de n’Amer nature park lies to the south of Cala Millor. It’s a beautiful peninsula, complete with a crumbling 17th-century fortress. The 200 hectares include dunes, scrubland and pine groves, creating an intriguing blend of flora and fauna. If you drive inland from Cala Millor for 20 minutes, you’re in the Serres de Llevant area. These mountains have trails that take anything from a few hours to a week of trekking to complete. While much of Majorca’s coastline is studded with hotels and apartment blocks, inland it is bursting with nature and beauty waiting for you to explore.

Best things to do in Cala Millor

Hit the surf

Cala Millor’s broad bay and calm waters are perfect for water sports, which range from the sedate, such as paddle boarding and pedalos, to the more daring parasailing and jet-skiing.

Head underground

Just a short drive away, you can find the Coves del Drach – the island’s most impressive cave formations that also feature one of the world’s largest underground lakes.

Go karting

You’ll find one of the island’s best go-karting tracks just outside the resort, where even kids as young as five years old can have a go tearing around the course.
Beaches