Holidays in
Tsilivi

A characterful Greek resort

Tsilivi holidays offer a rare combination of authentic Greek charm, unspoiled natural beauty and vibrant nightlife. Once a quiet fishing village, the town’s status as a bustling resort is relatively new. Along its bougainvillea-lined streets, cool karaoke bars and craft shops are nestled next to authentic Greek tavernas.

Due to its laid-back vibe and large sandy beach, Tsilivi is particularly popular with families and couples. Days can be spent enjoying the crystal-clear waters of the Ionian Sea and the beach’s fine white sand. Food lovers will rejoice at the sheer quantity of places to eat. There are quaint local tavernas and cafés alongside lively seafood restaurants, as well as bakeries with irresistible window displays full of sticky baklava and tasty locally made nougat. Whether you enjoy making sandcastles or eating spicy Greek sausages, holidays to Tsilivi are sure to please.

Your Tsilivi questions, answered

Yes, it is. Families can relax and make the most of the beach or, if they’re craving a little adventure, they can visit the local water park and mini golf course.

Tsilivi Beach is popular during peak season – get there early in the day to avoid the crowds and grab a spot, or drive west to the quieter Tragaki or Bouka beaches.

There are numerous shops along Tsilivi’s main strip selling a mixture of traditional handmade goods, locally made olive oil, Zante wine and pretty souvenirs.

Best things to do in Tsilivi

Watch traditional dancing

Tsilivi has plenty of evening entertainment at its bars and live-music venues. The traditional Greek dance performances are rather captivating, so be sure to catch a show.

Have fun at the beach

Tsilivi Beach is split into two halves – one side with sunloungers and the other without. If you want to try water sports, you’ll find everything from pedalos and banana-boat rides to jet-skiing.

Visit an observatory

Admire the ruins of the ‘vardiola’ (stone observatory) that sit on the northern part of Tsilivi beach. Built by Venetian officials when they ruled over the Ionian Islands, it was used to spot enemy ships.