Holidays in
Basilicata

A rich and alluring Italian region

Dramatically beautiful Basilicata is a region of rugged mountain ranges and towns perched above deep-green forests, dizzying gorges and sparkling sea. And it’s the location of one of Italy’s most extraordinary towns: Unesco-listed Matera, whose houses are built into and above natural caves at the edge of a gorge.

Basilicata holidays can be about beaches, too, as the region has some ridiculously charming coastline close to the town of Maratea, edged by a twisting road with views to rival those on the Amalfi Coast. The beaches here are black sand, lapped by a dark-blue Tyrrhenian Sea, and the towns sit on wooded hills, with buildings the colours of pale sherbet. Near Metaponto there are more lovely beaches, as well as spectacular ancient ruins. To discover a part of Italy that feels like a well-kept secret (loved by those in the know), holidays to Basilicata are a wonderful choice.

Your Basilicata questions, answered

Absolutely – there are guided tours of Matera’s caves (known as ‘sassi’), where you’ll learn more about the people who inhabited them from prehistoric times right up until the 1950s.

It’s a toss-up between the black-sand beaches that lie close to the charming hilltop resort of Maratea and the white-sand stretches near the ancient ruins at Metaponto.

There are some terrific trails around Matera, as well as in the Pollino National Park – you can self-guide or take a tour to explore the splendid scenery.

Best things to do in Basilicata

Dine out in the caves

After an informative tour of the caves, you can spoil yourself and celebrate your new knowledge by eating at one of the restaurants now housed in these ancient spaces.

Visit the Redeemer

There’s a huge Christ the Redeemer statue above Maratea that is second only to the one in Rio. Approach up the winding road for sweeping views across the coast.

Explore Metaponto

As well some long crescents of white sandy beach, Metaponto has a superbly preserved Greek temple, with impressive columns, dating from the 6th century BC.