Holidays in
Brindisi

An Italian region with charm

Brindisi is where the ancient Roman road the Via Appia ends, and fun, history-filled, foodie holidays begin. By the glittering Adriatic in Puglia, on the heel of Italy’s boot, Brindisi holidays reveal traces of its ancient past, and the joy of age-old traditions. Evocative remnants of Brindisi’s ancient glory can still be seen, including the bright-white column marking the end of the Via Appia. Entertainment comes in the form of bewitching tarantella music and dancing, which folklore associates with the bite of the tarantula.

Food lovers will be in heaven on holidays to Brindisi – alongside tasty ham and fat olives, local specialties include ‘caciocavello’ cheese and fava beans. Flavourful ‘orecchiette al cime di rapa’ is a long-standing feature on trattoria menus here, and custard-filled ‘pasticciotti leccesi’ can be picked up at all the best bakeries. Sitting close, also within Brindisi province, is the whitewashed, much-photographed city Ostuni, and glorious Lecce, nicknamed the ‘Florence of the South’ thanks to its glorious Baroque architecture. Both are popular day-trip destinations.

Fasano and Cisternino, are other beautiful towns in the region, home to winding alleys and traditional restaurants – but a little more off the beaten track. For a holiday filled with rustic charm and ancient history, served up with a side of delicious Italian cooking, look no further than Brindisi.

All resorts in Brindisi

Three tips for a top trip

Jump on a trainGetting around by train is easy – head to the Baroque beauty of Lecce or majestic seaside fortress town of Taranto, on the opposite side of Puglia’s heel.
Get lost for a bitBrindisi’s winding, Vespa-filled streets are completely charming, and admiring its quaint houses, where floral baskets and laundry hang outside, offers a glimpse into the real Italy.
Visit FasanoThe celebrations in the run-up to Easter in nearby Fasano are particularly interesting, and include a life-size puppet of an old lady being paraded through the town.

Best attractions to see in Brindisi

The spectacular temple

Tempio di San Giovanni al Sepolcro is a striking, circular 11th-century temple. Look for richly-decorated reliefs of the Knights Templar, and tiles illustrated with animal designs.

The Duomo

The city’s original cathedral, dating from the 11th century, may have been destroyed by an earthquake, but this 18th-century reproduction still houses original Romanesque mosaics.

Ostuni

The maze-like alleys and whitewashed old town are made to be photographed, and it’s a great place to pick up chic souvenirs, such as gorgeous lacquered ceramics.

Your Brindisi questions, answered

Before you get to the pasticciotti leccesi – custard-filled pies – be sure to try the locally grown artichokes. Handpicked and officially marked ‘Artichoke Brindisi PGI’, they are top-quality Italian produce.

Despite the Lombards trying to destroy it, Brindisi has outlived the Greeks, Romans, Ostrogoths, Byzantines and Normans. Elements from each era’s architecture can be seen today.

La Nzegna, the colourful and skillful flag-waving ceremony that dates back to 1100, is held in Carovigno every year for a few days just after Easter.